Tag Archives: colorectal cancer

Exercise as Medicine for Gastro-Intestinal Cancer Surgery Patients

Photo of man in a gym ssetting, holding a towel around his neck.Exercise interventions that increase physical activity prior to a patient undergoing surgery or during chemo/radiotherapy for colorectal cancer and other types of cancer have demonstrated improvements in daily activities, social activity, and fatigue, anxiety and depression.1 “If exercise were a drug, it would have no trouble getting FDA approval,” says Niraj J. Gusani, MD, associate professor of surgery, medicine and public health sciences, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Dr. Gusani and Amanda B. Cooper, MD, assistant professor of surgery, have launched rigorous research programs for patients with upper GI cancers, studying the effects of physical activity as it relates to recovery from surgery and long-term survival.

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Chromoendoscopy for Colorectal Cancer Surveillance in IBD

Emmanuelle Williams, M.D.

Emmanuelle Williams, M.D.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with a significantly higher risk of colorectal cancer than the general population. To improve early colorectal cancer detection, patients with a ten-year history of extensive colonic IBD are recommended to undergo colonoscopy surveillance at least every two years. Emmanuelle D. Williams, M.D., Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center explains, “Currently recommended surveillance techniques (at least thirty-three random biopsies obtained from the entire extent of the colon) for IBD patients are time consuming and limited by a relatively low colorectal cancer detection rate where up to 25 percent of precancerous lesions are missed. Part of the challenge is the difficulty in visualizing pre-cancerous lesions in IBD patients because they can be multiple and flat with subtle irregularities rather than polypoid.” Chromoendoscopy, a technique that uses dye to highlight dysplastic tissue in existence since the 1970s, was introduced to IBD surveillance in 2003, and has since proven to markedly increase dysplastic lesion detection. While simple and inexpensive to do, Williams notes, “The technique requires training and practice, and additional time needed for obtaining dye-targeted biopsies and thus is typically only offered in tertiary care settings.”

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Filed under Disorders, Treatments